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ancientart:

A quick look at: mourning in ancient Egypt.
Photo: Relief showing mourners from Saqqara, now at the Louvre, ca. 1330 BCE.
It could be argued that many funerals today are for the benefit of the living instead of the salvation of the dead. This however was certainly not the case in ancient Egypt; the funeral, like the mummification process, was a vital stage in regeneration of the deceased -not an end, rather the first stage in the final voyage.
The cortège which accompanied the mummy to the cemetery could include the sem-priest, lector-priest, the widow (or sometimes a paid substitute), friends, family, servants, and band of professional mourners. These professional mourners were hired to weep and wail, pull their hair and clothes, beat at their chests, and to smear their body with dirt -all of which were signs of uncontrolled behaviour. Among artistic representations of these professional mourners are often small girls emulating their moves, which may be indicative that mourners were trained on the job.
The grief of family members and mourners was artistically presented with remarkable intensity, solemn and silent sorrow was expressed by the placing of the hands over the cheeks or the head on the knees.
Those walking in the funeral had certain words to utter and speeches, all highlighting virtues of the deceased. This was an appeal to the gods of the underworld to take the deceased person to dwell amongst them. The words spoken were expressed from their hearts, and full of emotion and grief. Evidently very strong social and family ties existed in ancient Egyptian society. Some of these phrases written for the dead remain preserved for us to read today, here is one such example: ”Do not leave me, come to me, come look after us. O kind father!”
Shown artifact courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Anne-Marie Bouché. When writing up this post, Abeer el Shahawy’s The Funerary Art of Ancient Egypt (American Univ in Cairo Press, 2005) was of use. As was Joyce Tyldesley’s The Penguin Book of Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt (Penguin Global, 2012).

ancientart:

A quick look at: mourning in ancient Egypt.

Photo: Relief showing mourners from Saqqara, now at the Louvre, ca. 1330 BCE.

It could be argued that many funerals today are for the benefit of the living instead of the salvation of the dead. This however was certainly not the case in ancient Egypt; the funeral, like the mummification process, was a vital stage in regeneration of the deceased -not an end, rather the first stage in the final voyage.

The cortège which accompanied the mummy to the cemetery could include the sem-priest, lector-priest, the widow (or sometimes a paid substitute), friends, family, servants, and band of professional mourners. These professional mourners were hired to weep and wail, pull their hair and clothes, beat at their chests, and to smear their body with dirt -all of which were signs of uncontrolled behaviour. Among artistic representations of these professional mourners are often small girls emulating their moves, which may be indicative that mourners were trained on the job.

The grief of family members and mourners was artistically presented with remarkable intensity, solemn and silent sorrow was expressed by the placing of the hands over the cheeks or the head on the knees.

Those walking in the funeral had certain words to utter and speeches, all highlighting virtues of the deceased. This was an appeal to the gods of the underworld to take the deceased person to dwell amongst them. The words spoken were expressed from their hearts, and full of emotion and grief. Evidently very strong social and family ties existed in ancient Egyptian society. Some of these phrases written for the dead remain preserved for us to read today, here is one such example: Do not leave me, come to me, come look after us. O kind father!”

Shown artifact courtesy of & currently located at the Louvre, France. Photo taken by Anne-Marie Bouché. When writing up this post, Abeer el Shahawy’s The Funerary Art of Ancient Egypt (American Univ in Cairo Press, 2005) was of use. As was Joyce Tyldesley’s The Penguin Book of Myths and Legends of Ancient Egypt (Penguin Global, 2012).

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Victoria Santa Cruz - Me gritaron negra (musical):

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ancient Egyptian arched harp (shoulder harp) 
c. 1390-1295 BCE
Metropolitan Museum of Art

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ancient Egyptian arched harp (shoulder harp)

c. 1390-1295 BCE

Metropolitan Museum of Art

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ancient Egyptian arched harp (shoulder harp) 
c. 1390-1295 BCE
Metropolitan Museum of Art

ancient-egypts-secrets:

Ancient Egyptian arched harp (shoulder harp)

c. 1390-1295 BCE

Metropolitan Museum of Art